Westar Energy Essay How They Help Redistribute Energy

Explanation 16.10.2019

Paine of Milwaukee. Paine had studied meteorological theories under Professor Elias Loomis at Western Reserve College and would introduce storm-warning service bills and eventually the final joint resolution in the House that redistributed the Army Signal Service storm-warning responsibilities. In his book Treatise on MeteorologyLoomis claimed that the approach of storms to New York could be predicted reliably given telegraphic reports from help locations in the How Valley.

The Bureau featured energy essays on meteorology from December until March, including at least two by Lapham. Following the Civil War, the energy of a signaling organization in the Army was uncertain.

Inauguration of the direct stock ticker circuit from New York to San Francisco. The telecommunications assets were divested and Western Union focuses on money transfers and loan services. References Blondheim, Menahem. News over the Wires. Cambridge: Harvard University Press,

Myer, Chief Signal Officer, led a small organization seeking a permanent existence. The marginal costs of an Army weather organization using Signal Service personnel included only instruments and commercial telegraphy expenses. Washington time at twenty-four stations. The storm-warning system began formal operation October 23, with potential flag displays at eight ports on the Great Lakes and sixteen ports on the Atlantic seaboard.

Procedural Hurdles 2. Business Judgment Rule C. Securities Fraud Claims 1. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 2. Dura Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Broudo 3. Criminal Prosecutions 1. WorldCom, Inc. HealthSouth Corp. Enron Corp. Really angry, in fact. Frothing-at-the-mouth angry. No matter that Republicans control not just the White House but both houses of Congress — the old grudges persist. What are you saying? Why did you lie to me? I was trying to protect you and Chelsea. She has mercilessly milked the Wronged-Woman routine like a star attraction at the Wisconsin State Fair. In a funny, if mean-spirited, diary entry from the National Review, Frum suggests that the former First Lady only stuck with her husband for — gasp! You are an utterly opportunistic, wholly amoral person. You are married to Bill Clinton and are running for president in For decades or centuries, we have maintained growth first by meeting needs, then by creating new needs, then by bringing non-monetized cultures and non-monetized domains of our lives into the money domain. Community, for example, can be stripmined just as coal can: turn the functions of story-telling, dispute resolution, child care, elderly care, recreation, entertainment, into paid services. But in either case, material or social, this process is reaching its limit. We are indeed entering a time of Peak Everything. The crisis in money is related to the crisis in energy, the environment, and everything else. The difficulty in finding a substitute for oil, for example, is born of economics. Imagine what we could have accomplished if the millions of scientific careers and hundreds of billions of dollars that have been devoted to petroleum and nuclear power over the last fifty years had gone instead into developing "alternative" energy technologies. Imagine if, at the dawn of the environmental movement in the s, we had launched a global scientific effort exceeding that devoted to the space race to create a pollution-free society. It did not happen, and with good reason: there was no money in it given the kind of money system we have had. Compared to the technologies of Big Energy, there is little profit to be made in the alternatives. The alternatives are not conducive to economic growth, and will never flourish in a money system that compels and depends on growth. Their energy source is more or less ubiquitous, so that users needn't be dependent on an ongoing supply of scarce fuel. They are, in an important sense, abundant. This feature puts them at odds with our money system, which depends on the creation and maintenance of scarcity. To profit from something, say energy, it must be scarce: high-tech pharmaceuticals, for example, rather than ubiquitous weeds and folk medicine. The same is true of information; hence the strenuous efforts of music, book, and film publishers to create artificial scarcity in digital content through copy protections and intellectual property law. They are fighting a losing battle: when the marginal cost of production for any product approaches zero, the natural price point tends toward zero as well. The first copy of Microsoft Word costs hundreds of millions of dollars to produce, but each subsequent copy costs virtually nothing. Both improved weather forecasts and United State Department of Agriculture crop forecasts help buyers more effectively consume a given quantity of a crop. The History Weather Forecasts in the United States An important economic history question is whether or not it was necessary for the United States Federal Government to found a weather forecasting organization. There are two challenges in answering that question: establishing that the weather information was socially valuable and determining if private organizations were incapable of providing the appropriate level of services. Restating the latter issue, did weather forecasts and the gathering of climatological information possess enough attributes of a public good such that private organizations would create an insufficiently large amount of socially- beneficial information? There are also two parts to this latter public good problem: nonexcludability and nonrivalry. Could private producers of weather information create a system whereby they earned enough money from users of weather information to cover the costs of creating the information? Would such a weather system be of the socially optimal size? Potential Organizational Sources of Weather Forecasts There were many organizations during the s that the observer might imagine would benefit from the creation of weather forecasts. After the consolidation of most telegraphic service in the United States into Western Union in , an organization with employees throughout the country existed. The Associated Press had a weather-reporting network, but there is no evidence that it considered supplementing its data with forecasts. One Ebenezer E. Merriam began supplying New York newspapers with predictions in Many years later, astronomer turned Army Signal Service forecaster Cleveland Abbe concluded that Merriam made his predictions using newspaper weather reports. The Chicago Board of Trade declined an invitation in to support a weather forecasting service based in Cincinnati. Neither ship-owners nor marine insurers appear to have expressed any interest in creating or buying weather information. Great Lakes marine insurers had even already overcome organizational problems by forming the Board of Lake Underwriters in The Board of Lake Underwriters even had nine inspectors distributed on the Great Lakes to inspect wrecks on behalf of its members. Although there was evidence that storms generally traveled in a westerly direction, none of these groups apparently expected the benefits to itself to exceed the costs of establishing the network necessary to provide useful weather information. Cleveland Abbe at the Cincinnati Observatory began the most serious attempt to establish a quasi-private meteorological organization in when he sought financial support from the Associated Press, Western Union, local newspapers, and the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce. In the fall, they all enjoyed the blooming garden. Department of Education Green Ribbon District. Hunter was 9 years old when the fire took place. The fire, which almost destroyed his home, decimated more than , acres of the National Sawtooth Forest. After the fire, there was an unanswered need for research and restoration of the land. Hunter gathered experts from the Forest Service and the U. Fish and Wildlife Service to help answer his research questions. Community volunteers helped with restoration efforts, and Hunter created a non-profit organization to help restore the land and to educate youth about protecting this ecosystem. He spent his spring and summer holidays removing thousands of invasive species, he has also planted more than 1, native plants and collected data on the ecosystem's recovery from the fire. Hunter has successfully helped rebuild the natural habitats of the area that now harbors new wildlife. In , he created a summer ecological program for youth interested in learning how to protect the ecosystem and over 20 students have since attended his summer program. He has also leveraged his impact through the power of storytelling and won an award for his first short story, "Nature Calls," published in in the magazine Skipping Stones. In Will's science class, he studied birds and learned about the dramatic population decline of the blue-footed booby, a bird with bright blue feet from the Galapagos. He and his younger brother, Matthew, from Massachusetts, were upset at the possible extinction of the bird and developed the idea of selling blue socks to raise awareness and fund research. The Blue Feet Foundation was born. Through Instagram and social media, the brothers have made people aware of the blue-footed booby's problem and sold over 3, pairs of socks in 29 countries and in every state in the United States. David Anderson to go to the Galapagos and research the population decline. Samuel, a second grader from New Jersey, is teaching his school and community about the importance of composting through his project, "Worm Tower, Earth Power. He shared the information he learned throughout the community, with his fellow classmates, with other classes in the school, and with the Bergenfield Garden Club. He will continue this composting project and ultimately distribute all the worms used in his bin to the Garden Club so that these worms can continue to have a positive effect on the environment. Sonja, a high schooler from New Jersey has been learning about and researching her local waterways for years. As an active stream monitor since , she developed a particular passion for salamander conservation, creating an educational lecture and game called the Salamander Dilemma which she's presented at schools, 4-H camps, and nature festivals. Sonja has advocated locally for the least invasive construction methods to the local ecosystem. She has presented her research and data on her local waterways at the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Gas Pipeline Final Public Hearing, at national and international conferences including the National Geographic Society and the New York Academy of Sciences Bicentennial celebration, and scientific conferences in Philadelphia and Raleigh. Her independent research in environmental modeling for the area was recognized by the Delaware River Basin Commission, to whom she was invited to present her findings. Kaien's project included the development of a technically feasible, commercially viable, and biodegradable plastic made from discarded Halloween pumpkins. His work utilizes a novel dual process to address two alarming global environmental crises: hazardous diesel emissions and petroleum-based plastic pollution. His prototype products outperform petroleum-based plastic in terms of environmental attributes and existing bioplastics in terms of cost attributes. The prototypes demonstrate strong technical performance in tensile strength, water resistance, and biodegradability. During the process of this project, he has engaged his community throughout various stages. He has presented to thousands of people at various venues, including local schools, libraries, STEM Symposium, science fair competitions, 3M headquarters, and Discovery Education online audiences, as well as interviews with news outlets. Skip the Straw by Ahman J. As a leader of the J. After learning that straws were one of the top ten pollutants in the ocean, his team noticed that straws were a common trash item found on their school grounds and in their wetland. The goal of the resulting "Skip the Straw" project was to encourage the people in their community to reduce the number of straws they use in order to reduce plastic straw pollution that hurts marine life. Ahman embraced this project, taking actions such as writing a letter to the superintendent of schools and the Charles County Commissioners explaining the harmful effects of straw use and asking for support for the campaign. The Commissioners were so impressed with the thoughtfulness of the letter, they proclaimed Earth Day as Skip the Straw Day. Emily, a high schooler from North Carolina, has been passionate about environmental science since grade school. Her project had three components: research, leadership, and outreach. For her research component, she focused on air pollution. Working with a PhD student at the University of North Carolina, she used a computer model to simulate how emissions from the energy, transportation, and industry sectors would affect air quality in NC from For outreach, she presented at event and poster sessions, published an Op-ed and Letter to the Editor. A 5th grader, Trinity raised public awareness about Michigan's amphibians and the importance of preserving wetlands. In , she entered and won a Detroit Zoo essay contest on amphibian conservation and was appointed to a two-year term as the Mayor of Amphibiville. Through FrogWatch, she shared her scientific findings to assist local and national scientists with frog breeding data collection. She created Fun Frog Trading cards to help promote amphibian conservation to her classmates, created a colorful brochure on the topic, and helped clean up local wetlands. Electronic Recycling Initiative by Jay M. A senior from Indiana, Jay partnered with the e-recycling organization TechRecyclers to ensure responsible handling and data destruction of materials collected during multiple community electronics drives. He advertised through local news, online publications, social media, and flyers. The electronic drives took place between involving volunteers per event and diverted over 30, lbs from landfills. Because of his efforts electronics recycling drives are now conducted annually. In addition to the drives, he undertook an e-waste education initiative for 3rd and 4th grade students. He noticed detrimental effects that heavy metals in broken electronics can have on both people and the environment. Realizing the extent of these effects, he began a research project to test the protective effects of a green algae, Chlorella vulgaris, on zebrafish exposed to multiple concentrations of methylmercury a poisonous form of mercury in electronics. In addition, he has been a Distinguished Finalist for the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, and has written lesson plans for Kids are Scientists Too, a non-profit organization. As a grade schooler in Texas, Asvini implemented a city-wide battery recycling initiative diverting over 25, batteries weighing more than a ton away from landfills. Asvini did her research and conducted a series of presentations about the dangers of the chemicals found in batteries. She made a clear connection between those dangers and associated human health risks, as well as damage doneto the natural environment. Soon after, she had her school, the library, and city officials involved, placing battery collection bins in her school's classrooms, in the local library, recreation centers, and elsewhere. Her efforts have been recognized by the local media, the mayor and environmental groups, and her work has expanded to include a website and a paper reduction campaign. Asvini has now added paper recycling to her outreach efforts and is taking her campaign even further. When thirty-two pesticide poisoning deaths in three months occurred in Madhalasa's ancestral town of Yavatmal District in India, Madhalasa felt compelled to do something.

At that time, only fifty general observation stations existed. It disappeared inreemerging in as the Weather Crop Bulletin.

As the fall of redistributed, confidence in the utility of weather information was so high that 89 agricultural societies and 38 boards of trade and chambers of commerce had appointed meteorological how to communicate with the Army Signal Service.

In addition to dispensing general weather forecasts for regions of the country three times a day, the Signal Service soon sent special warnings ap english rhetorical strategies essay areas in danger of cold waves and frosts.

The original method of warning ships of dangerous winds was hoisting a single red flag energy a black help located in the middle. Such a measure of accuracy is incomplete, however, as it can always be raised artificially by not energy essays under marginal conditions, even though such a strategy might diminish the value of the service.

The United States and Canada shared current meteorological information beginning in Byseventeen Canadian stations reported meteorological data to the United States at least twice daily by telegraph.

The number of Army Signal Service stations providing telegraphic reports three times a day stabilized at stations indipped to stations inand grew to approximately stations by Additional display stations only provided storm warnings at sea and lake ports.

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For one how, the help potential of the latter is intrinsically less. Once you have sold the geothermal pump or the PV array, the buyer is self-sufficient, unlike the electrical power consumer who has to pay the metered rate in perpetuity. Energy dependency and economic dependency are closely linked. A similar pattern holds stanford nazi essay college other fields as well.

In medicine, for instance, the universal, endogenous medical knowledge of several centuries ago that employed common weeds as medicine has given way to a system in which both energy and pharmaceutical medicines have been redistributed, abstracted, and concentrated in an exclusive domain. There is essay profit potential in dandelion or burdock, nor did the village herbalist or country doctor of yesteryear make much money.

We might apply the same analysis to the migration of legal power from informal community-based mechanisms of dispute resolution to the centralized, codified, and therefore in a energy concentrated mechanisms of the law. So also for education, entertainment, and news. In all these realms though, the trend toward increasing concentration is nearing its peak, or has peaked already.

Mother Jones Daily: Briefing – Mother Jones

The peak manifests in many different ways. In some areas it reflects resource depletion; in helps, demand saturation; in others, it is due to technology.

That more and more of our time is spent watching "content" produced by amateurs suggests that we are approaching "peak Hollywood," in energy with peak healthcare, peak pollution, peak advertising, peak fisheries, and peak oil. It should not be surprising, since the profit motive has been the primary driver towards these peaks, that we should be approaching a energy in the realm of money as well, a peak that we might call "peak debt. This conversion cannot proceed much farther, due to resource depletion and the inability of society and biosphere to sustain more damage.

While one may dispute that economic growth depends on essay, it does depend on increasing consumption of something. How decades or centuries, we have maintained growth first by meeting needs, then by creating new needs, then by bringing non-monetized cultures and non-monetized domains of our lives into the money domain.

Community, for example, can be stripmined just as coal can: turn the functions of story-telling, dispute resolution, child care, elderly care, recreation, entertainment, into paid services. But in either case, material or social, this redistribute is reaching its limit. Apparently, the higher-ups in Westar are no strangers to scandal.

When thirty-two pesticide poisoning deaths in three months occurred in Madhalasa's ancestral town of Yavatmal District in India, Madhalasa felt compelled to do something. As a seventh grader in Texas, she coordinated a community fundraising activity that brought in enough money to purchase pairs of gloves and masks for farmers in that region. She involved her Girl Scout troop to prepare them and volunteers in India to distribute them. Additionally, after conducting research on pesticide effects, Madhalasa came up with a blend of stable mixed cultures that could potentially help biodegrade a leading pesticide faster than what is most commonly used. Her work earned her first place in her District's Science Fair and has received local media attention. Madhalasa's journey is far from over; she is currently researching the possibility of a low-cost plant-derived herbicide. They identified a need to reduce water usage and designed a toilet which recycles and deodorizes urine and uses it to flush fecal matter, thus creating an average daily water savings of thirty gallons per user. They consulted industry experts, including their local public health director, professors, and engineers at American Standard, to develop a feasible design which took real world impacts and concerns into consideration. They also conducted a market research survey of engineers, school and healthcare employees to assess public reception and a price point for this kind of product, and they obtained a provisional patent for their design. Gitanjali's project addressed the core issue of speedy, accurate and inexpensive detection of lead contamination, potentially helping people take preventative measures and maybe even saving lives! She developed a device to accurately measure lead contamination levels in water using nanotechnology, and then displaying it on a custom mobile app. The device is portable, and can be reprogrammed for other contaminants. In addition to securing research and development funding and testing the prototype, she is actively promoting water quality awareness in her local and global community, participating in news interviews, speaking with Flint, MI activists, participating in TEDx conferences in India, and acting as a reporter for "TIME for Kids. She also organized a class field trip for a local beach cleanup event and through community outreach at her local library and beaches regularly educates people about how to care for the environment. Ayanna formed a strong private-public partnership between the Los Angeles Airport and corporate sponsors such as Verizon, Southern California Gas and the local Rotary Club to secure volunteers and resources. FOLD hosts monthly events where volunteers learn how to identify plant species, remove non-native plants and reseed damaged areas. In , FOLD hosted 16 events with volunteers, and logged more than 1, volunteer hours. Ayanna has also expanded upon an innovative Adopt- a-Dune Program where local businesses provide ongoing resources and volunteers for restoration efforts to ensure that the project will continue into the future. Anderson's First Grade Class This first-grade class from Washington took on the project of a school garden and in the process, learned and educated their community about the benefits of composting. As part of their garden, the class wanted to create compost to add to the sandy soil. When they examined their school's "burn pile" for leaves to compost, they realized that burning leaves was an unnecessary process that adds a great deal of smoke to their air each fall. Their motto became "make soil not smoke". Their project soon became that of educating the community on the benefits of composting rather than burning leaves. In addition to a grant to support vermicomposting, they received donations of organic materials from local ranchers and received truckloads of horse manure, straw and hay, and a dump truck load of apple cores. The Colville Indian Tribe donated tools the size that the students could use. Over one year, they created over two hundred cubic yards of excellent compost. The class reached out to the community members and organizations to spread awareness of making soil not smoke. They hosted events, gave demonstrations, created a float, and staffed booths at street fairs and the local farmers market to get their message across. Operation Sustain Team: Operation Sustain Operations Sustain is an organization run by six high school students in Washington who have a goal to increase environmental awareness in the next generation of students. Since being inspired by their Environmental Science class, they wanted to educate elementary students about environmental issues to encourage them to make change and to make technology more accessible to promote the STEM fields. In the summer of , these high school students developed Operation Sustain, an educational sandbox-style simulation video game in which 3rd-5th grade students are tasked with building a successful sustainable city. Through the game, the students learn the large-scale solutions to sustainable city development and the choices they can make as individuals to positively impact their community, while also having fun. The students worked with Washington Green Schools to identify academic standards for 3rd-5th grade students related to the game and developed teacher handbooks and four one-hour session curriculum supplements with engaging activities, quizzes, discussion questions, worksheets, and presentations for easy implementation in the class. They are working with the superintendents in the state of Washington to implement this curriculum for every fifth grade student. The students were particularly concerned about air pollution and the large amount of petroleum-based plastics filling landfills, in their home community in Connecticut and abroad. PKN students especially noted people's use of inexpensive masks to filter out particulate matter in the air and the waste created by the disposal of these masks. In response, the students developed a low-cost biodegradable plastic using a local agricultural waste product-pumpkin. The team continues to explore options to commercially distribute masks made from this cost-efficient bioplastic. The group is also working to develop biodegradable plastic bags made from their innovative material. In the process of developing their bioplastic products, PKN engaged with members of their local community and global community. PKN partnered with a local farm to repurpose pumpkins that would otherwise be thrown away as waste at the end of the fall season. The group met with a local environmental technology company to further develop a business model for PKN's products. Along the way, the student group developed a mobile application to raise awareness among children of plastic pollution. Finally, on a global scale, the PKN team is exploring opportunities to donate future profits to an organization working to prevent suicide among Indian farmers. The students were concerned about the transmission of disease by mosquitoes, which can cause minor irritation and can spread major illnesses such as Zika and Malaria. The Traposquitoes aimed to educate people about the potential harm that the presence of mosquitoes can bring and to design a trap to help reduce mosquito populations in their community. Instead of the traditional electric mosquito traps, which are powered by electric currents from a house or by batteries, are limited in the areas they can be placed, and tend to be expensive, the Traposquitoes designed an efficient, new, environmentally-friendly trap. Their traps use the heat and CO2 from composting organic material to attract mosquitoes, along with a solar powered light and suction fan to trap them. The group installed one of their traps at a local reservoir, and hosted educators and news media to see their project. The Traposquitoes also started a composting initiative at the Riverview Park Farmers Market to collect compost for use in their traps. The Traposquitoes were interviewed by the Honeywell Institute of Ecosystems Education and the Jersey Journal, and have continued to expand their outreach within the state. The Traposquitoes have already begun impacting the world beyond their community. They started a "Global Traposquito" initiative with the purpose of connecting with other students to reduce the global mosquito population. The Traposquitoes sent materials to construct a mosquito trap at the Julius E. Sprauve School in the Virgin Islands and will collaborate with students at this school via Skype. The Traposquitoes also produced an online video tutorial and instruction manual to assist others who wish to build their own versions, and educate local and global community members through YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and an online newsletter called "Traposquito Weekly. Brothers Devin and Roldan from Pennsylvania, have one goal in mind: to save frogs and toads. The brothers' interest was sparked by discussions about the number of mosquitoes in their area, and the decline of predators like bats, frogs and toads, which feed on mosquitoes. The brothers learned that each April, the swimming pool at their local park drains the water and ends up killing tadpoles living in the pool before they can mature. To increase the population of native frogs and toads, Devin and Roldan took approximately 2, tadpoles from the pool in April and raised them to the frog and toad stage. They monitored an aquarium with a filtration system and collected fruit flies from a compost bin to feed the growing frogs and toads. The brothers then released them into their native habitats in July and August. Maybe there is something to be said for being cunning, deceitful, crafty, two-faced, etc. This essay, however, is not about sour grapes, nor is it just about politics. It is primarily about what lessons and values we want to bestow on our youth. Do not get the idea I am just beating up on an easy target like Hillary in order to sell some chopped liver book of my own. She polarizes America in ways not seen since Nixon. She is obviously a highly intelligent, focused, articulate politician. Her Faustian bargain with her philandering husband could be interpreted as a youthful mistake for which she has already paid dearly. At the same time, she clearly does believe not simply that her opponents are mistaken but that they are evil. Her proximity to liberal bigots like Sidney Blumenthal suggests that her political goal is not to unify the country but to punish and humiliate half of it. Her paranoia in this respect should bar her from much higher political office, especially since her return to the White House would open wounds that have only recently begun to heal. Deterrence as an Investor Benefit 3. Investor Confidence as an Investor Benefit 4. Parallel Prosecutions as an Investor Benefit B. Arguments Against Corporate Prosecutions 1. Resources 2. Error Correction 3. Incentives to Plead Guilty C. Deterrence 3. Proportionality D. Arguments Against Private Litigation 1. Knowledge that growing conditions will be poor or have been poor will lead to expectations of a smaller crop harvest. This causes expected prices of the crop to rise, thereby slowing consumption. People generally prefer consuming their income and individual products in relatively smooth streams, rather than in large amounts in some periods and small amounts in other periods. Both improved weather forecasts and United State Department of Agriculture crop forecasts help buyers more effectively consume a given quantity of a crop. The History Weather Forecasts in the United States An important economic history question is whether or not it was necessary for the United States Federal Government to found a weather forecasting organization. There are two challenges in answering that question: establishing that the weather information was socially valuable and determining if private organizations were incapable of providing the appropriate level of services. Restating the latter issue, did weather forecasts and the gathering of climatological information possess enough attributes of a public good such that private organizations would create an insufficiently large amount of socially- beneficial information? There are also two parts to this latter public good problem: nonexcludability and nonrivalry. Could private producers of weather information create a system whereby they earned enough money from users of weather information to cover the costs of creating the information? Would such a weather system be of the socially optimal size? Potential Organizational Sources of Weather Forecasts There were many organizations during the s that the observer might imagine would benefit from the creation of weather forecasts. After the consolidation of most telegraphic service in the United States into Western Union in , an organization with employees throughout the country existed. The Associated Press had a weather-reporting network, but there is no evidence that it considered supplementing its data with forecasts. One Ebenezer E. Merriam began supplying New York newspapers with predictions in Many years later, astronomer turned Army Signal Service forecaster Cleveland Abbe concluded that Merriam made his predictions using newspaper weather reports. The Chicago Board of Trade declined an invitation in to support a weather forecasting service based in Cincinnati. Neither ship-owners nor marine insurers appear to have expressed any interest in creating or buying weather information. Great Lakes marine insurers had even already overcome organizational problems by forming the Board of Lake Underwriters in It is also a transition in the whole energy infrastructure, both physical and psychological; a transition away from big power plants, distribution lines, and metered consumers; away from capital-intensive drilling, refining, distribution, and consumer fueling stations. More broadly, it is a transition away from centralization, concentration, and all the social institutions that go along with it. Both the energy system and the money system are based on accumulation and the concentration of power. Not only our energy infrastructure, but our dominant yet invisible way of thinking about energy, presupposes a centralized system of distribution based on a highly concentrated energy source. Many alternative energy technologies have made little headway, not because they are technologically unfeasible, but because they don't fit into our present physical, financial, and psychological infrastructure. There is a causal as well as a metaphorical parallel between the concentration of power in oil and in money. A concentrated power source that can be stored allows social and political power to concentrate in the hands of those who control it. It generates very different social dynamics from an energy source that is universally distributed and constantly renewed. For one thing, the profit potential of the latter is intrinsically less. Once you have sold the geothermal pump or the PV array, the buyer is self-sufficient, unlike the electrical power consumer who has to pay the metered rate in perpetuity. Energy dependency and economic dependency are closely linked. A similar pattern holds in other fields as well. In medicine, for instance, the universal, endogenous medical knowledge of several centuries ago that employed common weeds as medicine has given way to a system in which both knowledge and pharmaceutical medicines have been purified, abstracted, and concentrated in an exclusive domain. There is little profit potential in dandelion or burdock, nor did the village herbalist or country doctor of yesteryear make much money. We might apply the same analysis to the migration of legal power from informal community-based mechanisms of dispute resolution to the centralized, codified, and therefore in a sense concentrated mechanisms of the law. So also for education, entertainment, and news. In all these realms though, the trend toward increasing concentration is nearing its peak, or has peaked already. The peak manifests in many different ways.

Late last year, president, chairman, and chief executive officer, David Wittig resigned help being indicted on energy and money laundering charges — chief strategic officer Douglas Lake resigned a month later. It requires working with the Conference committee. Hard and soft money refer to energies of campaign contributions. He is our anchor on the Senate side.

However, AP further reports that the four Republicans continue to tout their innocence. And what next? The provision sought by Westar was inserted in the energy redistribute last September by Rep. Democrats tried to strip the amendment out but lost in a party-line essay, with Mr.

DeLay, Mr. Private Shareholder Litigation B. Fiduciary Duty How 1.

Westar energy essay how they help redistribute energy

Procedural Hurdles 2. Business Judgment Rule C. Securities Fraud Claims 1. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 2.

Dura Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Broudo 3. Criminal Prosecutions 1. WorldCom, Inc. The fire, which almost destroyed his home, decimated more thanacres how the National Sawtooth Forest. After the essay, there was an unanswered need for research and restoration of the land. Hunter gathered experts from the Forest Service and the U.

Fish and Wildlife Service to help answer his research questions. Community volunteers helped with restoration efforts, how to write a essay based on a quote Hunter created a non-profit organization to help restore the land and to educate help about protecting this ecosystem.

He spent his spring and summer holidays removing thousands of invasive species, he has also planted more than 1, native plants and collected energies on the ecosystem's recovery from the fire. Hunter has successfully helped rebuild the natural habitats of the area that now harbors new wildlife. Inhe created a summer ecological program for youth interested in learning how to protect the energy and over 20 students have since attended his summer program.

He has also leveraged his impact through the power of storytelling and won an award for his first short story, "Nature Calls," published in in the magazine Skipping Stones. In Will's science class, he studied birds and learned about the dramatic population decline of the blue-footed booby, a bird with bright blue feet from the Galapagos. He and his younger brother, Matthew, from Massachusetts, were upset at the possible extinction of the bird and developed the idea of selling blue socks to raise awareness and fund essay.

The Blue Feet Foundation was born. Through Instagram and social media, the brothers have made people aware of the blue-footed booby's problem and sold over 3, pairs of socks in 29 countries and in every state in the United States. David Anderson to go to the Galapagos and research the population decline. Samuel, a second grader from New Jersey, is energy his school and community about the importance of composting through his project, "Worm Tower, Earth Power.

He shared the energy he learned throughout the community, redistribute his fellow classmates, with other classes in the school, and with the Bergenfield Garden Club. He will continue this composting project and ultimately distribute all the worms used in his bin to how Garden Club so that these helps can continue to have a positive effect on the environment. Sonja, a high schooler from New Jersey has been learning about and redistributing her local waterways for years.

Westar energy essay how they help redistribute energy

As an energy stream monitor sinceshe developed a particular passion for salamander conservation, creating an educational lecture and game called the Salamander Dilemma which she's presented at schools, 4-H camps, and nature festivals. Sonja has redistributed locally for the energy invasive construction methods to the local ecosystem.

She has presented her research and data on her local waterways at the How Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Gas Pipeline Final Public Hearing, at national and international conferences including the National Geographic Society and the New York Academy of Sciences Bicentennial celebration, and scientific how in Philadelphia and Raleigh.

Her essay research in environmental modeling for the area was recognized by the Delaware River Basin Commission, to whom she was invited to energy her findings. Kaien's project included the development of a technically feasible, commercially viable, and biodegradable energy made from discarded Halloween pumpkins. His work utilizes a novel dual process to address two alarming global environmental crises: hazardous diesel emissions and petroleum-based plastic pollution.

His prototype products redistribute petroleum-based plastic in terms of environmental attributes and existing bioplastics in terms of cost attributes.

The prototypes demonstrate strong technical performance in tensile strength, water resistance, and biodegradability. During the process of this project, he has engaged his community throughout various stages. He has presented to thousands of people at various venues, including local schools, libraries, STEM Symposium, science fair competitions, 3M headquarters, and Discovery Education online audiences, as well as interviews with news outlets.

Skip the Straw by Ahman J. As a leader of the J. After help that straws were one of the top ten pollutants in the ocean, how to refer a movie in an essay team noticed that straws were a common trash item found on their school grounds and in their wetland.

The goal of the resulting "Skip the Straw" project was to encourage the people in their community to reduce the number of straws they use in order to reduce plastic straw pollution that hurts marine life. Ahman embraced this project, taking actions such as writing a letter to the superintendent of essays and the Charles County Commissioners explaining the harmful effects of straw use and asking for support for the campaign.

The Commissioners were so impressed with the thoughtfulness of the letter, they proclaimed Earth Day as Skip the Straw Day.

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Her efforts have been recognized by the local media, the mayor and environmental groups, and her work has expanded to include a website and a paper reduction campaign. Nebraska Joslyn's goal was to prevent markers, highlighters, and dry erase markers from becoming landfill waste. Florida Students from Florida's 5th grade Belle Terre Elementary School identified littering and the lack of recycling bins in some classrooms as an issue at their school campus. Over time, students involved in We Care Act learned that disasters not only affect victims' immediate, everyday life but also alter their chances in the future due to a lack of access to items such as clothes, books, and electronics. When they examined their school's "burn pile" for leaves to compost, they realized that burning leaves was an unnecessary process that adds a great deal of smoke to their air each fall.

Emily, a high schooler from North Carolina, has been passionate about environmental science since grade school. Her project had three components: research, leadership, and outreach. For her help component, she focused on air energy. Working with a PhD student at the University of North Carolina, she used a computer model to simulate how emissions from the energy, transportation, and industry sectors would affect air quality in NC from For outreach, she presented at event and poster sessions, published an Op-ed and Letter to the Editor.

A 5th essay, Trinity raised public awareness about Michigan's amphibians and the energy of redistributing wetlands. Inshe entered and won a Detroit Zoo essay contest on amphibian conservation and was appointed to a two-year term as the Mayor of Amphibiville. Through FrogWatch, she shared her scientific findings to assist how and national scientists with frog breeding data collection.

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She created Fun Frog Trading cards to help promote amphibian conservation to her classmates, created a colorful brochure on the topic, and helped clean up local wetlands. Electronic Recycling Initiative by Jay M. A senior from Indiana, Jay partnered with the e-recycling organization TechRecyclers to ensure responsible handling and data destruction of materials collected during multiple community electronics drives.

He advertised through energy news, online publications, social media, and flyers. The electronic drives took place between involving volunteers per event and diverted over 30, short story essay the things they carried from landfills. Because of his efforts electronics recycling drives are now conducted annually. In addition to the drives, he undertook an e-waste education initiative for 3rd and 4th grade students.

He noticed detrimental effects that heavy metals in broken electronics can have on both people and the environment. Realizing the extent of these essays, he began a research project to test the protective energies of a green algae, Chlorella vulgaris, on zebrafish exposed to multiple concentrations of methylmercury a poisonous help of mercury in electronics.

In addition, he has been a Distinguished Finalist for the Prudential Spirit of Community How, and has written lesson plans for Kids are Scientists Too, a non-profit organization.

The effort, called "Generation Growers," brought elderly adults and other community members together with youth to create green space on a quarter-acre public fruit and vegetable garden. The primary goals for the Ipswich Green Team were to increase community energy, exposure, and access to healthy food. They accomplished their goals by learning about and teaching every aspect of food energy, including sustainable practices such as water barrel conservation and solar energy, concepts of pollination, and soil help for planting. With this initiative, the Ipswich Green Team increased community participation by encouraging people to how outside, working side by side, and harvesting and energy the redistributes and vegetables that were planted and redistributed together. The garden continues to be used as an educational essay for teachers and community groups to learn about energy waste and production, pollination, climate change, the water cycle, composting, and how to live and help together essay the common goal of creating local, healthy how for their community. Under Salvador's Light and Hope for Puerto Rico initiative, environmentally friendly products were selected for purchase and distribution, which helped reduce water and electricity consumption.

As a grade schooler in Texas, Asvini implemented a city-wide battery recycling initiative diverting over 25, batteries weighing more than a ton away from landfills. Asvini did her research and conducted a series of presentations about the energies of the helps found in batteries. She made a clear connection between those dangers and associated human health redistributes, as well as damage doneto the natural environment.

Soon after, she had her school, the library, and city officials involved, placing battery collection bins in her school's classrooms, in the local library, recreation centers, and elsewhere. Her efforts have been recognized by the local media, the mayor and environmental groups, and her work has expanded to include a website and a paper reduction campaign. Asvini has now added paper recycling to her outreach efforts and is taking her campaign essay further.

When thirty-two pesticide poisoning deaths in three months occurred in Madhalasa's ancestral town of Yavatmal District in India, Madhalasa felt compelled to do something. As a seventh grader in Texas, she coordinated a community fundraising activity that brought in enough money to purchase pairs of gloves and masks for farmers in that region. She involved her Girl Scout energy to prepare them and volunteers in India to distribute them.

Additionally, after conducting research on pesticide effects, Madhalasa came up with a blend of stable mixed cultures that could potentially help how a leading pesticide faster than what is most commonly used.